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DARK CITY

RUFUS SEWELL (John Murdoch) won critical acclaim for his television debut in 1994 starring as Will Ladislaw in the BBC dramatization of George Eliot's "Middlemarch." More acclaim followed for his performance opposite Emma Thompson and Jonathan Pryce in Christopher Hampton's film Carrington and in Thames Television's "Cold Comfort Farm," which has also enjoyed a worldwide theatrical release.

After studying in London's Central School of Drama, Sewell made his film debut in 1991 as a Scottish junkie opposite Patsy Kensit in Twenty-One. Other film credits include Mark Peploe's adaptation of Joseph Conrad's Victory, opposite Willem Dafoe and Sam Neill; Kenneth Brannagh's Hamlet, in a scene opposite Sir John Gielgud; Channel Four Films' lavish adaptation of Thomas Hardy's The Woodlanders; BBC Films' A Man of No Importance opposite Albert Finney, and most recently, Marshall Herskovitz's The Honest Courtesan, an unusual love story set in the sixteenth century for Fox Searchlight Films.

Sewell made his West End theatrical debut in 1993 as a Czechoslovakian hustler in "Making It Better," which brought him critical acclaim and a Best Newcomer Award from the London Critics' Circle. He then played Septimus Hodge in the original production of Tom Stoppard's play "Arcadia" at the National Theatre.

In 1995 Sewell made his Broadway debut in the revival of Brian Friel's "Translations," winning the best reviews among a cast that included Brian Dennehy and Dana Delany. His other theatre credits include "Rat in the Skull," a Royal Court Production at the Duke of York.

Sewell has also been seen on British television in Jack Gold's "The Last Romantics" for BBC Television, "Gone to Seed" for central TV, "Dirty Something," "Citizen Locke" and the BBC's "Henry IV."

When they first met in New York five years ago while doing promotional chores, Sewell's Dark City nemesis Ian Richardson made the following prediction: "'With your face,'" I said, "'and the fact that you can act inside that face, you're going to be a great big star.' Now in this film I have my prediction proved true, and it's a pleasure to be back with him again to say it to his face."

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