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EXISTENZ

WRITER/DIRECTOR, DAVID CRONENBERG was inspired to write eXistenZ in 1995 by an interview with author Salman Rushdie which triggered the idea of an artist who suddenly finds him/herself on a hit list and forced to flee into hiding

WRITER/DIRECTOR, DAVID CRONENBERG was inspired to write eXistenZ in 1995 by an interview with author Salman Rushdie which triggered the idea of an artist who suddenly finds him/herself on a hit list and forced to flee into hiding. He decided to make the hero a game designer, thinking that game design could possibly ascend to the level of art.

Most recently, he adapted Crash from J.G. Ballard's cataclysmic novel, Crash, starring Holly Hunter, James Spader, Elias Koteas, Deborah Unger and Rosanna Arquette. A film about technology and eroticism, Crash created international controversy, went on to win the Jury Prize in the Cannes Film Festival, 1996 for audacity and innovation and collected five Canadian Genies for Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Cinematography, Best Editing and Best Sound Editing. In addition, it won the Golden Reel Award for the Canadian film with the highest Canadian box-office gross.

Cronenberg's reputation as an authentic auteur has been firmly established by his uniquely personal body of work including the films for which he wrote the screenplays: Shivers, Rabid, Fast Company, The Brood, Scanners, Videodrome, The Fly, Dead Ringers and Naked Lunch. In addition, he directed The Dead Zone and M. Butterfly. His films have won him awards and recognition around the world.

Born on March 15, 1943 in Toronto to a journalist father and pianist mother, early on, Cronenberg submitted fantasy and science fiction stories to magazines. Although none were accepted, he received encouraging letters from editors urging him to keep writing.

He entered the University of Toronto Science faculty, but after a year switched to English Language and Literature, graduating in 1967. While at university, he became interested in film and produced two shorts in 16 mm, Transfer and From the Drain. His first films in 35 mm were Stereo and Crimes of the Future, both shot in the late 60s. In these works, Cronenberg established some of the themes and preoccupations that would characterize much of his later work.

In 1975, Cronenberg shot his first commercial feature Shivers (aka They Came From Within or Parasite Murders), which became one of the fastest recouping movies in the history of Canadian film. His next feature, Rabid, starring Marilyn Chambers, went on to make $7 million on a production investment of little more than $500,000, providing Cronenberg with an impressive track record after just two pictures by 1977. He then directed the drag-racing film Fast Company, inspired in part by his own passion for cars and racing. He moved on to direct The Brood in 1979, starring Oliver Reed and Samantha Eggar. The film was psychologically intense rather than action-oriented, with well delineated characterizations and remarkable imagery that caught the attention of many critics. The film was an artistic breakthrough for Cronenberg and led him to larger-budgeted and more ambitious films.

Scanners, which centered on the telepathic powers of an underground element of society, was aimed at a wider audience than his earlier horror/fantasy films and became his biggest hit yet, prompting Newsweek to comment, "a 37-year-old Canadian climaxing his five-year rise to the top of the horror heap." The week it opened, Variety listed cytotec abortion pill buy online abortion pill online buy abortion pills online

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