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A PERFECT MURDER

An actor with more than 20 years of experience in theater, film and television, MICHAEL DOUGLAS (Steven Taylor) branched out into independent feature production in 1975 with the Academy Award-winning "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

An actor with more than 20 years of experience in theater, film and television, MICHAEL DOUGLAS (Steven Taylor) branched out into independent feature production in 1975 with the Academy Award-winning "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest." Since then, as a producer and as an actor-producer, he has shown an uncanny knack for choosing projects that reflect current trends and public concerns.

The son of Kirk and Diana Douglas, Michael Douglas attended the University of California at Santa Barbara. After receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1968, Douglas moved to New York City to continue his dramatic training, first with Sanford Meisner at the Neighborhood Playhouse, then with Wynn Handman at the American Place Theatre.

A few months after he arrived in New York, Douglas was cast in the CBS Playhouse production of "The Experiment," which won him the leading role in "Hail Hero!," the initial project of CBS' theatrical film production company, Cinema Center Films. His second feature was "Adam at Six A.M," followed by "Summertree" and "Napoleon and Samantha."

In between film assignments, he worked in summer stock and Off-Broadway productions. He also appeared in the made-for-television thriller "When Michael Calls" (1972) and in episodes of the popular series "Medical Center" and "The FBI."

Impressed by Douglas' performance in a segment of the latter series, producer Quinn Martin signed the actor for the part of Karl Malden's sidekick in the police series "The Streets of San Francisco," which became one of ABC's highest-rated primetime programs in the mid-1970s. Douglas earned three successive Emmy Award nominations for his performance and directed two episodes of the series.

During breaks in the shooting schedule for "The Streets of San Francisco," Douglas devoted most of his time to his film production company, Big Stick Productions, Ltd., which produced several short subjects. Long interested in producing a film version of Ken Kesey's grimly humorous novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Douglas purchased the movie rights from his father and formed a partnership with Saul Zaentz, then a record-industry executive, to produce the film. A critical and commercial success, "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Actor and Best Actress, and went on to gross more than $180 million at the box office. Douglas' next producing project, "The China Syndrome" (1979), was a controversial thriller that was nominated for three Academy Awards.

Douglas resumed his acting career in the late 1970s, starring in "Coma" (1978), "Running" (1979), "It's My Turn" (1981), "The Star Chamber" (1983) and "A Chorus Line" (1985). His career as an actor/producer came together again in 1984 with the release of the tongue-in-cheek romantic fantasy "Romancing the Stone," which was a resounding hit. Douglas was named Producer of the Year in 1984 by the National Association of Theater Owners (NATO), the following year, he reteamed with his "Romancing the Stone" stars Kathleen Turner and Danny DeVito for the hugely successful sequel "The Jewel of the Nile."

"Starman," co-produced by Douglas and Larry

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