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THE MASK OF ZORRO

For his extraordinary work in films, television and theater, ANTHONY HOPKINS (Don Diego de la Vega/Zorro) has been honored with an Academy Award¨, two Emmy Awards and the Laurence Olivier Theater Award

For his extraordinary work in films, television and theater, ANTHONY HOPKINS (Don Diego de la Vega/Zorro) has been honored with an Academy Award¨, two Emmy Awards and the Laurence Olivier Theater Award. He was also featured as ShoWest's Actor of the Year in Las Vegas in March.

Hopkins received his Oscar® for his remarkable portrayal of the brilliant, cultivated serial killer Hannibal Lecter in Jonathan Demme's chilling The Silence Of The Lambs. Since then, Hopkins has received two additional Academy Award® nominations, one for his performance in The Remains Of The Day, which also earned him the British Academy of Film and Television Award (BAFTA) for Best Actor, and another for his flawless portrayal of the 37th president in Oliver Stone's controversial Nixon.

Emmy Awards were bestowed on Hopkins for his portrayal of Bruno Hauptmann in "The Lindbergh Kidnapping Case" and as Hitler in "The Bunker."

Hopkins confesses he never thought about playing Zorro before the filmmakers approached him for the role. "When I was young, I remember seeing both the Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. and Tyrone Power versions of The Mark of Zorro, he recalls. "But when I became an actor, I never thought about playing the role."

When the filmmakers offered him the opportunity to play the older Zorro, he responded, "Now that I'm in my autumn years, I may as well have some fun."

As a classically trained actor, Hopkins had dueled before. To convey Zorro's prowess, however, the actor underwent extensive preparation with swordmaster Bob Anderson and whip coach Alex Green. In the end, he mastered both effectively-especially the whip.

"Alex was my stunt double in The Edge," Hopkins explains. "During his down time on the set, I would always see him off cracking his whip. He even gave me a whip as a present when the film wrapped. Little did I know what was in store for us." Of his experience making The Mask of Zorro, Hopkins recalls, "When I would get back to the hotel at night I felt that we had always done a good day's work and had a good day's adventure."

Hopkins stumbled into acting when, at 17, he wandered into a YMCA amateur theatrical production in his native Port Talbot, Wales. He immediately knew he was in the right place. Hopkins used his proficiency at the piano to apply for a scholarship to the Welsh College of Music and Drama in Cardiff, where he studied from 1955 to 1957.

Upon graduating, he worked with several small theater companies before seeking further training as an actor. He auditioned for London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in 1961 and was accepted on a scholarship. In 1965, he joined the National Theater under Sir Laurence Olivier.

Hopkins made his film debut in 1967 in The Lion In Winter with Katherine Hepburn. From then on he has worked steadily, juggling roles in films, television and theater.

American television viewers discovered Hopkins in ABC's 1973 production of Leon Uris' "QBVII." The following year, he made his Broadway debut starring in the National Theater production of "Equus." When the play moved to Los Angeles, Hopkins went with it to re-create his role as the psychiatrist. He remained in Los Angeles for the next 10 years, working extensively in American films and television.

Hopkins returned to

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