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HOW STELLA GOT HER GROOVE BACK

KEVIN RODNEY SULLIVAN (Director) makes his feature film directorial debut with HOW STELLA GOT HER GROOVE BACK.

Sullivan, a native of San Francisco, began his career as an actor, appearing in films and television programs. At age 14, he took a permanent position with that city's prestigious American Conservatory Theater, performing in many stage productions including "Midsummer's Night's Dream." At 19, Sullivan moved to Los Angeles where he was cast in the films "More American Graffiti," "Night Shift" and "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan." He ultimately landed a regular role on "Happy Days," playing one of the second generation of teenagers for the final four seasons of that series.

While still working as an actor, Sullivan, who had been writing screenplays on "spec," sold his first script - an episode of "Fame" - at age 22. Sullivan subsequently received feature writing assignments and additional episodic work. An offer from ABC-TV to create his own primetime drama soon followed. "Knightwatch," which Sullivan created, executive produced, wrote and directed, debuted in the fall of 1988 - directly opposite the number 1-rated "The Cosby Show." Ironically, Sullivan was at the time writing a feature screenplay for Bill Cosby to produce.

Sullivan's work on "Knightwatch" catapulted him into the ranks of the handful of sought-after writer-producers in the television industry. His critical and financial success in television brought him also to the attention of the feature film community. George Lucas enlisted him to write the screenplay of "Red Tails," an epic story about the Tuskegee airmen. Later he worked with Norman Jewison on the screenplay of "The Good Times Are Killing Me," a feature film project for Sullivan to direct.

Most recently Sullivan directed the critically acclaimed 1-IBO original movie "Soul of the Game," which received best picture nominations from the CableACE Awards and the NAACP Image Awards. His "America's Dream: Long Black Song" and "Cosmic Slop Tang," also for HBO, won four CableACE Awards in 1996 and 1997.

Sullivan lives in the Los Angeles area with his wife Nita, a screenwriter, and daughter Nicole.

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