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THE DEPARTED

MARTIN SCORSESE (Director) recently directed the biopic "The Aviator,” which was honored with five Academy Awards; three Golden Globe Awards, including Best Picture – Drama; and four BAFTA Awards, including Best Film; as well as numerous other accolades. In addition, Scorsese earned Oscar, Golden Globe and BAFTA Award nominations, as well as a Directors Guild of America Award nomination for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures. He was also named the Director of the Year by the London Film Critics Circle.

Scorsese was born in 1942 in New York City, and raised in the downtown neighborhood of Little Italy, which would later provide the inspiration for several of his films. In 1966, he earned a master's degree in film communications from New York University's School of Film. During this time, he made numerous prize-winning short films, including "The Big Shave.”

In 1968, Scorsese directed his first feature film, "Who's That Knocking at My Door?” He went on to serve as an assistant director and an editor on the 1970 documentary "Woodstock,” and then won critical and popular acclaim for his 1973 film "Mean Streets.” The following year, Scorsese directed his first documentary film, "Italianamerican.”

Scorsese's "Taxi Driver” was awarded the Palme d'Or at the 1976 Cannes Film Festival. He followed with "New York, New York,” "The Last Waltz,” and "Raging Bull,” which garnered two Academy Awards. Scorsese subsequently directed such films as "The King of Comedy,” "The Color of Money,” "The Last Temptation of Christ,” "GoodFellas,” "Cape Fear,” "Casino,” "Kundun” and "The Age of Innocence.”

In 1996, Scorsese completed the four-hour documentary "A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies,” co-directed by Michael Henry Wilson. The documentary was commissioned by the British Film Institute to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of cinema. In 2001, Scorsese made "Il Mio Viaggio in Italia,” an epic documentary that affectionately chronicles his love for Italian cinema.

Scorsese's long-cherished feature film project, "Gangs of New York,” was released in 2002, earning a number of honors, including a Golden Globe Award for Best Director. The following year, PBS broadcast the seven-film documentary series "Martin Scorsese Presents: The Blues.”

In 2005, "No Direction Home: Bob Dylan” was aired as part of the "American Masters” series on PBS and released on DVD worldwide. The documentary brought Scorsese a Grammy Award for Best Long Form Music Video.

Scorsese is the founder and chair of The Film Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to film preservation. He is also a co-chair of the Tribeca Film Festival. Over the course of his career, he has received many awards and honors, including: the Golden Lion from the 1995 Venice Film Festival; the AFI Life Achievement Award in 1997; the Film Society of Lincoln Center's 25th Gala Tribute in 1998; the Cavaliere di Gran Croce, Italy's highest honor, presented in 2000; the DGA Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003; and the Officer de la Legion d'Honneur, presented by the Culture Minister of France for outstanding service to France, in 2005.

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