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At Theaters: 12/17/1999 On Video: 6/13/2000
Rated: PG Length: 2 hr. 13 min.
Internet: Web Site Movie ID: 129909
Studio: Touchstone Pictures Inc.
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Storyline Heading

The life and times of an android, who is purchased as a household robot programmed to perform menial tasks. The Martin family quickly learns that they don't have an ordinary robot as Andrew begins to experience emotions and creative thought. In a story that spans two centuries, Andrew learns the intricacies of humanity, life and love.

DETAILED STORYLINE
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Movie Type (Genre) Heading
Drama Comedy - Bicentennial Man is a comic fantasy about a robot with a desire to be human. It is likely to appeal to fans of Robin Williams, as well as to those who enjoy light comedy with uplifting story elements. Some viewers may consider the story too sentimental, and the running time over two hours is a bit long.
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Cast and Crew Heading
Robin Williams (Jakob The Liar)
Sam Neil (The Horse Whisperer)
Embeth Davidtz (Fallen)
Wendy Crewson (Air Force One)
Oliver Platt (Lake Placid)
Director: Chris Columbus (Stepmom)
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Production Notes Heading
About The Production
Location
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Content Heading
PROFANITY: Moderately strong and moderately frequent
SEX/NUDITY: Some discussion of sexual content
VIOLENCE: No violent content
DRUGS/ALCOHOL: Drinking beer and wine in two scenes
ACTION: No action content
COMEDY: Slapstick visual humor, fish-out-of-water humor
DETAILED CONTENT
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Pictures © Touchstone Pictures Inc. ®
All Rights Reserved.

Critic's Review Heading
Average
And so Robin Williams' career has come full circle -- after two decades of box office success and an Academy Award, he's playing Mork again. The intentions may be good in this sentimental fish-out-of-water fantasy, but director Chris Columbus can't even bring his usual gee-whiz pacing to his take on artificial intelligence in existential crisis. That leaves Williams to flounder in yet another maudlin role in yet another maudlin film, the film's simple pleasures lost in its ineffective philosophizing.
DETAILED CRITIC'S REVIEW
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Opinion Heading

Based on an Exit Polling of 225 Moviegoers

Ages Age Group
How
Many
Your Probability of
Enjoying This Movie
*
Would
Recommend
Movie To Friends
1-12Children (M/F)
42
Very High
95%
13-19Teens (M)
15
High
93%
13-19Teens (F)
21
Very High
100%
20-29Yg Adults (M)
15
Very High
100%
20-29Yg Adults (F)
24
High
92%
30+Adults (M)
45
High
96%
30+Adults (F)
63
High
98%
*Possible Ratings: Very High, High, Fairly High, About 50/50, Fairly Low, Low, Very Low.

About Our Opinions

Be sure to read the DETAILED OPINIONS
The positive and negative comments made by moviegoers are very
helpful when selecting a movie that's appropriate for you and your family.

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OPINION GRAPH


D ETAILED S TORYLINE
"Bicentennial Man" spans two centuries, during which it is the goal of a single individual to learn all he might about the intricacies of humanity, life and love. Through his efforts Andrew, a popular robot model, teaches as much as he learns. He shows the world how to open its eyes and its heart to receive any being with enough compassion to ask for acceptance.

Andrew appears as a typical robot. Upon his delivery, there are four members of the Martin home: Richard Martin, whom Andrew respectfully refers to as Sir; his wife, simply as Ma'am; and their two children Grace and Amanda, who will always be Miss and Little Miss, respectively.

Little Miss is the first to call him Andrew, because she misunderstands him to be an android, which of course, he is not. He is a robot: A NorthAm Robotics NDR-114 that has been purchased, as he himself describes, "To perform menial tasks. Cooking. Cleaning. Making household repairs. Playing with or supervising children." The children, however, are at first suspicious of this new member of the household. Miss sees him as an uninteresting simple appliance, common in the homes of her friends. Little Miss thinks he's a bit scary. She, of course, has nothing to fear as the First Law of Robotics states, "A robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction cause a human being to come to harm."

It is perhaps the Second Law of Robots, "A robot must obey all human orders except where such orders conflict with the First Law," which leads the Martin family to change their perception of Andrew. For it is following an incident in which Miss orders Andrew to leap from an upstairs window (an order which he is compelled to follow) that leads Sir to proclaim, "Though Andrew is technically a piece of property, he shall be treated as if he is a person." In treating Andrew as human, are they starting to see human traits? Is he indeed showing some very anthropomorphic signs of creativity, curiosity and friendship? Or is it merely as the NorthAm Robotics executives explain, "An appliance with human form showing signs of mechanical failure, interpreted as eccentricity."

Sir decides to not only allow Andrew his creativity but to encourage and cultivate the behavior as he believes Andrew to be a unique individual.

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