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LOST IN SPACE

About The Production
The first science fiction adventure about a family's intergalactic voyage aboard a sabotaged spaceship, Lost In Space is inspired by the nostalgic television series which has become a cult classic

The first science fiction adventure about a family's intergalactic voyage aboard a sabotaged spaceship, Lost In Space is inspired by the nostalgic television series which has become a cult classic.

Producer and screenwriter Akiva Goldsman remembers playing "Lost In Space" games as a kid. "When Richard Saperstein, New Line's executive VP of production, called me and said, The project is available, and we will buy it if you will write it,' I thought Wow, it was my favorite TV show.'" Goldsman then faced the challenge of taking a popular, often campy television series and translating the franchise into a blockbuster movie that would appeal to audiences of the '90s.

"When adapting material like this, you have to be true to the history of the project," said Goldsman, "but you have to give it a new interpretation and voice. What captured my heart and mind was the story of the family. I grew up in a family that was very fragmented, as did a lot of kids in the '60s in America. It was a time when everything was coming apart and reforming, and the series was about the cohesion of family -- a family forced to stay together when they are hurled into space and become dependent on each other. The idea of a father who protects, a mother who nurtures, siblings who work with each other, and everyone wearing space suits with ray guns and fighting monsters was great. Those were the things I remembered when the movie was proposed."

Both Goldsman and New Line knew the success of their dream of bringing Lost In Space to the screen hinged on their choice of director. "Richard and I talked with a few directors that were interested," said Goldsman, "and Stephen Hopkins had a wonderful vision for it, which harmonized with ours. He has truly elevated the material."

Crucial to the story was the casting. "Putting the Robinson family in outerspace is a crisis that must have real emotional resonance, and to do that you need great actors," said Goldsman. The producers decided to cast the role of Dr. Smith first. "We wanted an anchor, and Gary Oldman was always our first choice."

"I met with Stephen and Akiva," Oldman recalled, "and I liked Stephen's vision of the movie they were going to make."

The next step was to approach William Hurt for the role of John Robinson. "I had seen a few episodes of Lost In Space' as a kid," said Hurt, "and it raised interesting issues, like artificial intelligence versus natural intelligence. These were big questions that were ahead of their time, and I think that is why it attracted the audience that it did. Like the original series, the film intrigued me because it was saying that human beings need each other more than they need machines."

With Oldman and Hurt in place, the rest of the cast was quick to come aboard. The role of Maureen Robinson went to Mimi Rogers, one of the most versatile actresses in Hollywood. "I play the ultimate space mother," Rogers joked. "What I found so appealing about the script, is that you have got the sci-fi and the adventure and all the bells and whistles of the special effects, but it's rooted in a family situation."

Playing the Robinson daughters are Heather Graham and Lacey Chabert. Graham, known for her many roles in independent feature films, including the critically acclaimed Boogie Nights, was<

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