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TOMORROW NEVER DIES

The Locations
LOCATIONS

FRANCE...

The crucial pre-title snow sequences were shot high in the mountains of the French Pyrenees, under the supervision of 2nd Unit director Vic Armstrong, making extensive use of one of the few operational high altitude airfields in Europe.

Filming took place in January/February to make best use of the snow and ice. Four Czech L39 Jet Fighters were featured in this segment - two on the ground and two in the air.

The airport location, in the ski resort of Peyresourde, was situated on an exposed ridge and completely surrounded by snow-covered peaks at an altitude of over 5,000 feet. The Unit was based in the town of Luchon, 14 kilometers down the mountain, an old thermal bath center which is now a seasonal tourist resort.

The road to the mountain location was opened each morning with the help of snow ploughs and gritters and a final patrol was back at base by eight o'clock in the evening. When heavy snow falls were encountered, a convoy procedure was adopted and no single vehicle permitted access to the location in these dangerously adverse conditions.

Special effects supervisor Chris Corbould remembers: "We only had six weeks to get that all on the road. We were still importing weapons and explosives from the UK and America into France after we started shooting. We had some French pyrotechnics to keep us going in the meantime but that was how tight it was.

There were a lot of explosions and bullet hits during this sequence which terminated in a massive cruise missile explosion which involved a lot of petrol and dynamite - 300 to 400 gallons of gasoline and several pounds of dynamite."

MEXICO ...

The Bond Model Unit, under the supervision of John Richardson, started their seven week shoot on May 26 at Fox Baja Studios at Rosarito where Twentieth Century Fox had built a 40 acre "studio" facility for their epic production of "Titanic", directed by James Cameron.

The ocean front tank is the largest in the world with an area over 360,000 square feet and is located 3 hours from Los Angeles and 20 minutes from the US/Mexican border.

Several exciting miniature action scenes were completed here including the sinking of the British frigate H.M.S. Devonshire and the climactic battle between Carver's Stealth Boat and H.M.S. Bedford.

Steadfast cooperation from the Royal Navy back in Britain did not stretch to sinking a fully-equipped missile bearing frigate, hence the miniature option.

THAILAND ...

James Bond returns to Thailand for the first time since 1974 when Cubby Broccoli filmed The Man With the Golden Gun in Bangkok, Phuket and on a small island off Phang Gna Bay called Ko Phing Kan, which is now internationally known as 'James Bond Island' and firmly established on the tourist map.

"We actually prepared to shoot and set the film in Saigon and Hanoi and also found locations on the Vietnamese border with China," director Spottiswoode remembers. "They were all wonderful and remarkable places and we spent a week flying up and down Vietnam in a helicopter. That was the most interesting and, finally, the most frustrating because after giving us permission to shoot in Vietnam they withdrew it.

They got scared that there was too much western influence too quickly. To have so many foreigners come in on such a high profile enterprise, they lost heart for a while and felt that it was going too fast. So, just three weeks before shooting, we have to find a whole new set of locations...which we did in Thailand."

Because Bangkok is itself not featur

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