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KILL YOUR DARLINGS

Transformed, Transforming
Ultimately, KILL YOUR DARLINGS isn't a film about the death of David Kammerer, or the birth of the Beat movement, but a personal and generational coming of age that's simultaneously highly specific and inherently universal. "For me," reveals Krokidas, "at the heart of this movie is the inspiration of knowing that you can do something important with your life, but also the drama and the conflict of what you have to go through in order to become yourself. The fancy way of saying this is, it's about the emotional violence that comes with the birth of a self. For me, the murder is just a literal interpretation of that violence, of that death that needs to happen in order for one to be reborn."

Certainly, the epochal reverberations of the incident are well charted, as Michael C. Hall observes: "It sent Kerouac across the ocean, and Burroughs to Chicago and then south of the border. Ginsberg, I guess, is the only one who stayed put but he certainly absorbed or sublimated it and moved forward with a creative explosion. It's a seminal event; it's wild that most people haven't heard that much about it."

"I think every generation discovers the Beats anew," muses Austin Bunn. "Funnily enough, when I was in college, I would go to the campus bookstore and read Allen Ginsberg poetry, just sitting there on the floor of the bookstore, transformed by the words I was reading. And now I'm the guy who's telling them, "Hey, go find these transmissions, they're out there for you.'"

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