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STALINGRAD

About The Production
Stalingrad was shot over 79 days, starting in September 2011 and wrapping in August 2012. From the beginning, director Bondarchuk insisted on shooting in stereo, as he realized that it would make the film highly expressive and give the audience full immersion into its atmosphere. Stalingrad was the first stereo experience, not only for Fedor Bondarchuk and for Maxim Osadchiy, the director of photography, but also for the physical and visual-effects specialists involved.

Maxim Osadchiy, director of photography, worked with a team of American 3D-supervisors and stereographers who worked on The Amazing Spider-Man and The Hobbit.

The filmmakers also chose a 3Ality Company stereo rig (a mechanical device with programming function), using two Red Epic cameras and a mirror arrangement. Two cameras were attached to the device and shot through a mirror set at a 45° angle. One of the cameras was taking the direct image, while the other one was filming through the mirror's reflection. On the whole, the crew had seven Red Epic cameras and three types of rigs to cover all the options.

When needed, Maxim Osadchiy was able to shoot from the shoulder (e.g. melee fights), from the Steadicam (smooth movement), and from the crane (panoramas). Flying master shots were filmed from the cableway with cameras installed on the spider. The option to choose between the rigs played a key role, because the relatively small set for shooting from the shoulder only allowed shooting with prime lenses. Zoom lenses with variable focal lengths were placed on larger rigs.

Key technical and creative issues related to stereo shooting were solved by working with supervisor Matthew Blute ("Dawn of the Planet of the Apes"), who developed a great professional relationship with the Russian crew. The shooting period was preceded by a preparatory stage, during which the filmmakers adjusted their cameras and discussed the stereo effects to determine which effects would be more significant than in the rest, based on the individual scene.

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