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BAD COMPANY

About The Production
"Jerry Bruckheimer is quite unique, and working with him is a wonderful experience from start to finish. It's bliss," says Schumacher, who, following their collaboration on "Bad Company," is currently re-teamed with Bruckheimer for Schumacher's eighteenth feature, the forthcoming Touchstone Pictures/Jerry Bruckheimer Films production, "Veronica Guerin (tentative title)."

"With Jerry, you get unconditional support and I got the opportunity to concentrate on directing without having to also produce as well," continues Schumacher. "Jerry truly loves his movies and it shows in everything he does. I've worked before with some of the people on Jerry's team, and I can tell you – they're the best of the best. With Jerry Bruckheimer productions, you can sense that it really is a team effort because everybody's in it together."

"The only drawback of working with Jerry is that you get very spoiled," Schumacher muses. "I don't know how many movies God has planned for me, but if I got a contract that said, ‘The rest of your movies are all going to be with Jerry,' that would be fine with me. I'd be a very lucky guy."

With casting complete and the production team assembled, Bruckheimer and Schumacher launched into production on "Bad Company" in the spring of 2001.

"The story is set in New York and Prague and we shot in both places," says Schumacher.

"We wanted to take every advantage of Prague's natural beauty and unique architecture because, as a city, it reflects the course of its history," observes Bruckheimer. "There are influences in Prague ranging from Baroque to Renaissance, which add a perfect mystique to go along with the storyline."

"Prague is a sort of meeting place for a lot of people," says Schumacher. "It's one of the most beautiful cities in the world, and the people were great to us. Hitler did not bomb Prague, so a lot of the famous architecture is still intact, and it sort of looks like a fairy tale kingdom."

"Many of the scenes in the script were written as taking place in rooms, but once we got to Prague we figured, what's the pointing of shooting there if you're not going to really capture the environment?" notes Schumacher. "We were allowed unprecedented access to certain landmarks such as the roof of the National Opera where no film crew had been before and may never be again."

"Dariusz Wolski is a brilliant cinematographer and I was thrilled he could shoot this film for us," says Schumacher. Wolski previously worked with Bruckheimer on "Crimson Tide" and most recently lensed Julia Roberts and Brad Pitt in "The Mexican."

"I had asked him to work with me on my first Batman movie, ‘Batman Forever,' but it hadn't worked out… until now," continues Schumacher. "Dariusz really took maximum advantage of showcasing Prague, as well as New York, while capturing the visual drama of an action thriller."

"Jan Roelfs and I had done ‘Flawless' together, and he is a fantastic production designer," Schumacher says, speaking of Roelfs, who earned Academy Award® nominations for his work on "Gattaca" and "Orlando." "He assembled a great team from the United States and from Prague, and he did a phenomenal job."

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