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QUEST FOR CAMELOT

About The Production

When Warner Bros. created its new Feature Animation division, it was inspired by the possibilities of telling full­length stories through the medium of animation. States Max Howard, President of Warner Bros. Feature Animation, "There is almost no type of movie that carries the stamp of its filmmakers as indelibly and uniquely as animated films. The artists are the storytellers, the actors, the stunt people, the special­effects crew, the production designers, the costumers and the directors of photography. Their point of view, as well as their talent and technique, creates the style and magic of the story.

"We were thrilled by the opportunity to create and tell a full­length story in a personal style representative of Warner Bros., with its rich legacy of animation as our inspiration.

"Through our heritage of the Looney Tunes," continues Howard, "we've enjoyed a reputation for really pioneering work and a tradition of making the greatest animated shorts. And one of the reasons I think millions of kids and adults have so enjoyed them is that there was a special nature, an irreverence in them. Now our goal is to bring that irreverence to our filmmaking, to try new things in storytelling as well as in graphic arts."

The first order of the day was to select a project on which to focus the energies of the new division. Although many projects vied for attention, the filmmakers kept returning to a story set in the early days of King Arthur's reign over Camelot.

Frederik Du Chau, a young Belgian animator and writer who had trained and worked with a number of prestigious animation companies, had joined Warner Bros. Feature Animation with a script of his own that he hoped to make. However, he, too, was intrigued by the dramatic possibilities of pageantry, dragons, brave knights and dangerfraught journeys ­ intrigued enough to want to be a part of the effort to bring it to the screen.

Says Du Chau, "The attraction of these stories of knights, villains and enchantment is almost limitless. We immediately realized that there were a million exciting possibilities, and we thought we could bring something new to the genre that would make it our own."

Du Chau was chosen to direct the project and writers began adapting the material for the screen. Says Du Chau, "When you work on an animated movie you know you're going to be committing several years to your project. We all felt that this was something we could stay excited about for that complete period of time."

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