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22 JUMP STREET

Action
One of the hallmarks of 21 Jump Street was the action - all of which was rooted in story, character, and comedy. In planning the sequel, the filmmakers took the same approach, even as they upped the ante.

"It's a joke that sequels have to be bigger and crazier, but then we started filming we realized it's actually true," says Lord. Still, the bigger and crazier action had to rise out of the characters and their relationship. "We tried to have the moment within that action piece be a great comedic moment. If there is not a joke, it doesn't work in this movie."

Neal H. Moritz, so well-known for his action films, says, that the first film required a delicate balance between the action and the comedy, but this time around - because it's a sequel - they could play around a bit more. "I don't see this as an action comedy, I see this as a comedy with action," he says. "But this time around, the characters have already been established, so we can get into the movie a little quicker - we ran with it."

In fact, the movie opens with a chase scene with Schmidt and Jenko atop an eighteen-wheeler (a stunt that Hill and Tatum performed themselves), and Landau says it's a perfect example of the way the filmmakers incorporated comedy into the action. "Channing jumps onto the truck, managing to go after the bad guys, while Jonah ends up stuck hanging upside down off the side," she says. "You've always got to try to tell a story within the action sequence - it's not just about being fast and suspenseful."

Another chase scene is even more ridiculous: Tatum and Hill drive through campus in a football helmet car, chased at breakneck speed by the bad guys in a Hummer.

"The helmet car is funny," says Tatum, "but it's really Jonah's expressions that make the scene."

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