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THE X-FILES

The Creative Team
Executive producer Lata Ryan was brought into the production by Chris Carter for the tremendous work she had done on such epic-scale productions as "Jurassic Park," "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom," "Return of the Jedi," "Back to the Future II" and

Executive producer Lata Ryan was brought into the production by Chris Carter for the tremendous work she had done on such epic­scale productions as "Jurassic Park," "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom," "Return of the Jedi," "Back to the Future II" and "Back to the Future III." "She understands production very well," Carter notes, "and we needed someone who could facilitate getting the job done. While Dan [Sackheim] was there to make artistic judgments, Lata made sure we had the tools and ability to get things in front of the camera to make a good film."

Ryan was integral not only in overseeing the nuts and bolts of physical production, but also in bringing aboard the myriad consultants and technical specialists, such as storyboard artists, aerial coordinators, insect experts, and special effects, visual effects and creature effects technicians.

The key figure in bringing Carter's story to life is director Rob Bowman, one of the best and most prolific helmers of the series. Says Carter: "I chose Rob to direct because of his loyalty and all the great work he's done on the show and with me. I don't think there was anyone more equipped to do it. He understands the storytelling techniques we like to employ. He knows how to scare people. And he's got a 'big movie' sensibility that he always brought to the small screen."

Dan Sackheim agrees: "Without question, Rob was the best choice to direct. Short of Chris Carter, he knows 'The X­Files' better than anybody. He's a wonderful collaborator and the talent love him."

The road that led to Bowman getting the nod to direct the feature began nearly six years ago when he saw the show's pilot episode. Bowman said to himself, "That's a great show! I could really sink my teeth into that" ... which he did, 25 times over five seasons. Bowman always knew the show lent itself to theatrical possibilities and he hoped to be considered when the time came to make an "X­Files" feature film. So when he received a call from Carter asking if he'd like to direct the movie, he enthusiastically accepted.

Bowman was particularly delighted that the scope of the movie would offer him more time to flesh out the characters, focus on individual moments, and provide a stronger attention to detail than is possible in a television format. "When watching a film in a movie theater, you're not a prisoner to the distractions of viewing something in your living room," he points out. "You're only there to watch a movie. And therefore the focus is more intense. The screen is bigger. Everything is magnified."

Along with its provocative stories and subject matter, "The X­Files" has developed a signature visual style, which utilizes elements such as extreme close­ups and flashlight beams searching through the dark. To continue that look and convey his own cinematic style, Bowman chose Ward Russell as the film's director of photography.

"This film is unique in that there was a body of work on the TV show that precedes it," notes Russell. "So my challenge was to transform the moods and images that have become known as 'X­Files' into the big­screen version. We weren't trying to duplicate what has been done on the TV series; we tried to amplify it, creating what wou

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