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THE FORGOTTEN

About The Production
The city of New York is an uncredited character in The Forgotten. Production began in the fall in Brooklyn, in the recently gentrified neighborhood known locally as "Dumbo" (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) — which is in fact between the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges. The area provided the exteriors for Ash Correll's (Dominic West) apartment and that of several scenes built around a car and foot chase undertaken as Ash and Telly Paretta (Julianne Moore) flee the police. Overall, the film shot in numerous areas of Brooklyn and Manhattan as well as select locations in the Bronx and Queens. Other Brooklyn locations included townhouses in Brooklyn Heights and the western edge of Prospect Park. The production spent several days in the Wall Street area of Manhattan at Chase Manhattan Plaza with its huge and distinctive Jean Dubuffet sculpture, "Group of Four Trees." A scene that finds Telly in the Brooklyn Public Library was shot at the General Society Library on 44th Street in Manhattan, which is the second oldest continuously operating library in New York City, and one of only three private libraries left in Manhattan. Built in the 1890s, the library is an integral part of the General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen of the City of New York. 

There were also a few locations outside of New York City, including Harriman State Park in Rockland County, Westchester Airport in White Plains and two Long Island locations -- a beach house in Hampton Bays and the dunes at Caumsett State Historic Park in Huntington.

Interiors were shot at the decommissioned Military Ocean Terminal in Bayonne, New Jersey, where numerous sets were built, including the inside of Ash's apartment, a cottage, Dr. Munce's house, a motel room, police headquarters, an airline office, the upstairs of Telly's townhouse and a huge neglected hangar where the dramatic climax of the film takes place. 

"Manhattan is a sort of ominous thing looking over the shoulder of Brooklyn, and it's a character in this movie,' says producer Dan Jinks. "That's very much the kind of mood Joe Ruben was going for. In addition, we shot in the fall and winter when it's bleak, cold, and scary looking, especially in Brooklyn." 

Producer Bruce Cohen concurs. "It was such a thrill for us to be shooting in New York. Unfortunately, over the years so many productions have gone to places like Canada, Australia, and even North Carolina for financial reasons. But in doing so, you lose the tangible atmosphere that only New York City can give you. The feeling that shooting in New York gives to the film adds to it immeasurably." 

Julianne Moore, who lives in New York City, was also a factor in the decision to shoot the film locally. "I live here, my children are in school here, and I did not want to go away," she says. "But It was also important because the city is almost a character in the movie. I like the huge urban presence. It adds colors to the story." 

Linus Roache was also happy to be filming in New York. "Every American project I've done ended up shooting in Canada. So to actually shoot on American soil is fantastic, and New York is my favorite city in the world, so I loved it. I like the whole New York vibe — always have. Just being with a New York crew is really a lot of fun. There's a great energy."

Of course, shooting in New York meant having to factor its unpredictable weather into the equation. Nicolaides says, "The biggest challenge making the film was that the director and the head of the studio both wanted the movie to have a cold, winter look. We started at the end of October, a very volatile time of year weather-wise, since we're going from fall into winter, yet the story takes place over the course of only two weeks. Therefore, what you start shooting in October, you'll have to watch when you're still shooting in January. The weather changes drastically from October t

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