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A NIGHT AT THE ROXBURY

About The Story
"A Night at the Roxbury" is based on the popular Roxbury Guys, the "we're so cool," head-bobbing night clubbers created by Will Ferrell and Chris Kattan and regularly played by them in sketches on "Saturday Night Live

"A Night at the Roxbury" is based on the popular Roxbury Guys, the "we're so cool," head-bobbing night clubbers created by Will Ferrell and Chris Kattan and regularly played by them in sketches on "Saturday Night Live." Ferrell and Kattan conceived the Roxbury Guys when they were polishing their stand-up skills at The Groundlings, Los Angeles' renowed comedy theatre, where they were spotted by Lorne Michaels for "Saturday Night Live."

The pair recall the birth of the Roxbury Guys: "We were out at a Los Angeles area club with friends," says Ferrell, "and we noticed this guy leaning up against the bar."

"You could tell he really wanted to dance, and he was sort of pathetic," Kattan recollects. "We kept checking him out and started picking up on his expressions and mannerisms. Something about this out-of-it guy intrigued us."

Adds Ferrell, "He was dying to be a scene, but he'd try and try, and come up with nothing. He was really out of his element - a dorky fish in glitzy water. Eventually, our impressions of him grew into the Roxbury Guys."

Ferrell and Kattan joined the cast of "Saturday Night Live" in 1995. The Roxbury Guys became "Saturday Night Live" regulars and, with no dialogue, one of its most popular acts. Their pick-up strategy huddles and relentless come-ons were always drowned out by the ear-busting music.

The act was an instant hit with audiences as well as within the entertainment industry, and soon featured guest stars such as Jim Carrey, Tom Hanks, Pamela Anderson Lee, Alec Baldwin, Martin Short and Sylvester Stallone.

It was in the winter of 1997 that Lorne Michaels, "Saturday Night Live's" creator and executive producer, told them filmmaker Amy Heckerling was a big fan and wanted them to bring the Roxbury Guys to full life in a theatrical feature.

Producer Lorne Michaels had already made two hit comedies, "Wayne's World" and "Wayne's World II," which were expanded from sketches by Dana Carvey and Mike Myers on "Saturday Night Live."

Producer Amy Heckerling refers to the Roxbury Guys as "lovable losers" and warmly recalls her first impressions, seeing the act on "Saturday Night Live." "They were kind of sleazy but you couldn't help loving them. What I appreciated most was they were not only hilarious, but whenever they got rejected, they acted as if it didn't bother them, they let the girls off the hook. But then they would turn back to the bar and shrug their shoulders in a way that showed it did bother them. That touched me. They reminded me of Charlie Chaplin, the lost little guy who's suddenly living the high life and going for an unattainable woman."

"I'm short, wiry and energetic -says Chris Kattan, who describes Doug "a cocky wheeler-dealer. Between two I'm the mastermind."

"I'm the tall, easy-going one," says "Fun-loving, naive and easy to manipulate. Steve just kind of flops around in life and doesn't get too bent out of shape one way or the other. Whoever Steve's talked to last is the person he listens to. He doesn't want to rock the boat. But you have to keep a tight leash on him or he'll wander."

Kattan elaborates, "Doug wants to be a rebel, he just doesn't have a blue. I act like I know what's going on. I alw

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