Navigation Bar - Text Links at Bottom of Page

THE NANNY DIARIES

The Look Of The Film
It was important for the production team that THE NANNY DIARIES be filmed entirely in New York, and, as much as possible, on location. "We worked very hard to find great locations all over Manhattan,” says executive producer Dany Wolf. "We were lucky enough to film at the Museum of Natural History, the Metropolitan Museum, Central Park, Bergdorf Goodman, among others. New York's embraced our production with open arms.” "I think Shari and Bob are trying to make this film a real love letter to New York with all its eccentricities, wonderful locations, and amusing people,” says Linney. "There's no place like New York.” "The notion of creating New York City somewhere else, would be crazy,” says Gladstein.

Working with cinematographer Terry Stacey (who previously teamed with them on AMERICAN SPLENDOR), Springer Berman and Pulcini sought to photograph New York with a heightened sense of reality, like an urban fairy tale. "We were thinking about something a bit along the lines of a contemporary BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S,” says Springer Berman. "That's the references we started with, and then Terry was the one who made it happen.” 

Not all the grandeur of New York City was found outside. "We scouted some pretty incredible apartments,” says Pulcini. "You don't realize what's behind some of the doors in Manhattan. I remember we saw one apartment that was so big that I lost all the people we were scouting with—just wandering around.” "It gives you a really different perspective on your life and the place that you live,” says Springer Berman.

Most of the film's interiors were shot on real locations all over New York, but production designer Mark Ricker created the X's immense and opulent apartment at Steiner Studios in Brooklyn. Ricker emphasized the formality of the place by playing with symmetry. "It's hard to look anywhere in the apartment without finding pairs of everything,” says Ricker. "There are pairs of mirrors, pairs of lamps, pairs of doors—there's no place for anything to be out of place. If it is, you'd know right away, because the other thing is still where it was.”

Costume Designer Michael Wilkinson previously teamed with Springer Berman and Pulcini on AMERICAN SPLENDOR, where the attire tended to be on the grungy side. "We were really excited to present him with a film where he could really go to town,” says Pulcini. And boy did he!” Among other things, Wilkinson created a host of outfits for various high and low society characters, as well as Namibians, Samoans, Pierrot clowns, and a Betsy Ross costume for Scarlett. "Everything you could possibly imagine is represented in the wardrobe of this movie,” says Pulcini.

With the costumes for Annie and Mrs. X, Wilkinson, Springer Berman and Pulcini collaborated closely with the actors. "I think everything that Scarlett wore in the move—except the gray business suit, which she hated, but Annie hated as well—was something Scarlett would have worn in real life,” says Springer Berman. "We wanted Annie to be someone who had her own idiosyncratic style that was a little bit funky and unique to her. We wanted her to be as far as possible from Mrs. X who could buy the big designer outfit of the moment. Annie couldn't afford to do that, but she could walk into a thrift shop and find an old dress for under a hundred dollars and look like she's wearing some designer outfit.”

Mrs. X's luxurious couture wasn't seen only as an expression of her privileged world. "One of the things we talked about with Michael and Laura is there's an element of insecurity with Mrs. X,” says Pulcini. "She's from money, but she's probably not from the kind of money that Mr. X and his family are from—so she overcompensates a little bit for that. We talked about her being the kind of person that's always trying on a look and maybe going one step too far with it. She's always trying to present some image of herse

Next Production Note Section

TOP

Home | Theaters | Video | TV

Your Comments and Suggestions are Always Welcome.
Contact CinemaReview.com

2014 22,  All Rights Reserved.

Google

Find:  HELP!

Google