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THE DARJEELING LIMITED

Anjelica Huston And Amara Karan
Joining Owen Wilson, Jason Schwartzman and Adrien Brody on THE DARJEELING LIMITED is an exceptional cast that includes Academy Award® winner Anjelica Huston, Camilla Rutherford, Irrfan Kahn and introducing Amara Karan.

Kahn, in a striking role, portrays an Indian villager whose life is changed by a sudden tragedy involving the three brothers. Kahn has recently drawn acclaim for his portrayal of Gogol's father Ashoke in Mira Nair's THE NAMESAKE as well as the Pakistani captain trying to find Daniel Pearl in A MIGHTY HEART.

But perhaps the story's richest roles are those of the women who complicate the brothers' Indian journey: Huston as the boys' unexpected (in several ways), long-lost mother; British actress Karan, as the seductive train stewardess, Rita; and Rutherford as Peter's pregnant wife Alice.

Huston, who has played matriarchs in Anderson's THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS and THE LIFE AQUATIC WITH STEVE ZISSOU, first heard of THE DARJEELING LIMITED in whispers. "There were murmurings on the set of THE LIFE AQUATIC WITH STEVE ZISSOU that Wes was going to do a film in India,” she recalls, adding, "and I was very happy that he decided to include me. Wes is such a unique artist and has such a fantastic eye that I'm always happy to participate and pleased when he asks. He inspires people to go out on limbs because of his own seriousness and his own sense of urgency.”

Huston was especially intrigued that Anderson was casting her as a woman who left her family behind to do nothing less radical than to become a nun. "I love nuns in movies,” Huston confesses. "I've always been a big fan of THE NUN'S STORY and there was a film that my father made called HEAVEN KNOWS, MR. ALLISON with Robert Mitchum and Deborah Kerr, in which she played a nun, which I always thought was great. I even wanted to be a nun when I was about six, but it was a brief, brief time. Nevertheless, I think they're sort of romantic and wonderful figures.”

Patricia Whitman, however, is not your ordinary, cloistered nun. "She's something of an action hero nun,” Huston says by way of description. "She's a rather unusual character – somebody who opened up a new chapter in her life by going to live in the Himalayas with orphans. Playing her was a bit of a leap of faith.”

She continues: "I think it is a very different part for me. I like to play very different parts but it takes Wes to think up a truly different part. I've played mothers before but never of this ilk. Patricia is someone who's very emotional, very volatile and that was a great challenge.”

While Patricia has woven herself into the heart of a poor Himalayan village, Huston, who doesn't like to fly, had never been to India and was astonished by what she saw. "You see things you cannot imagine,” she notes, "some incredibly beautiful, others violent, savage and upsetting. But the two aspects that really pull you in are the idea that you can be so in contact with your surroundings and the sense that forgiveness is everywhere, in spite of the poverty. I hope people who see the film will fall in love with India. It's a divinely gorgeous country and a seriously affecting experience.”

For Huston, each of the films she has made with Anderson has been an entirely unique experience. "Wes's style has been different on every movie I've made with him,” she says. "The circumstances have changed from shooting THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS in Harlem in winter to shooting in Rajasthan in spring. In this film, Wes was moving very fast, with a sort of Howard Hawks comic timing.”

As for having Wilson, Schwartzman and Brody as her three sons, Huston says: "They really do seem related in an odd way – and it was a real pleasure to work with all of them.”

Relating to the brothers in a completely different way is Rita the train stewardess, who winds up in whirlwind affai

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