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UNTRACEABLE

About The Cast
In Burnett's script, Jennifer Marsh, the FBI Special Agent at the center of Untraceable, became a complex and sometimes contradictory character with equal parts vulnerability and toughness. "Marsh is a very intense, determined FBI agent,” says Lucchesi. "She's the mother of an eight-year-old girl, who she's raising with the help of her own mother. She's the breadwinner of the family and also a devoted mom. And because of that, she works nights. She comes home at six in the morning, wakes her daughter up and takes her to school.”

To capture the various facets of Marsh's personality, from driven law enforcement agent to guilt-ridden single mother, the part required an actress of considerable range. Producer Koch says that everyone involved in casting the film was immediately enthusiastic about Diane Lane playing the role. 

Gary Lucchesi remembers a conversation he had with director Gregory Hoblit early in the casting process. "Greg liked Diane and we thought she would bring a level of verisimilitude to the role. We had met female FBI agents and they're interesting women, determined women and attractive women. Diane seemed to fit the bill very well.”

Hoblit says he has been a fan of the actress' since he saw her in George Roy Hill's 1979 comedy A Little Romance. "She was all of twelve years old,” he remembers. "We've seen her grow up and do some really remarkable work. There is always something very grounded and very real and authentic about her. She's a genuinely a gifted actress and brings a lot of intelligence and integrity to what she's doing.” 

Lucchesi notes that the role of Special Agent Marsh, a tough cop who struggles to leave the gritty reality of the job at the office and stay connected to her family, would more likely have been played by a man in the past. "But it's now Diane Lane instead of Harrison Ford or Mel Gibson, as it would have been a few years ago.”

Diane Lane found the idea of a female-driven thriller irresistible. "I like smart movies where the woman is at the helm of figuring it out and not just a damsel in distress prototype. And I was fascinated by the whole cyber-crimes division of crime. I'm so naïve, you can't imagine. I literally thought that computer viruses just spontaneously occurred, like viruses that we know in the world. It never occurred to me that people would maliciously invent harm and send it out into the universe like an arsonist or something.”

Actor Billy Burke, who plays Eric Box, a Portland police detective who joins forces with Marsh, calls Lane "one of the coolest people I've ever worked with.” 

Director Hoblit admits that before Burke walked in the room to read for Fracture, a movie they worked on together just prior to Untraceable, he had never even heard of the actor. "He did a great job with a role that didn't have a lot of dimension to it. He had a presence and an honesty that is hard to find.” After appearing in Fracture for Hoblit, Burke appeared in Lakeshore's Feast of Love. He didn't know he'd landed the role in Untraceable until about a week before the shoot. 

"In my experience, it's rare that people who say they want to work with you again actually give you the job,” says Burke. "I read the script and I knew that it was good and I wanted it. So when they said sit tight, that's what I did—for about two and a half months.” 

To prepare for the role, Burke immediately began spending time with a pair of Portland detectives, who invited him to accompany them while they worked. "They have been really informative,” says the actor. "I like to spend time with people and sort of steal their demeanor, get the sensibility of their lifestyle. These are two very laid back people. They bite off a whole lot, and they take their time chewing it. They don't make too big a meal out of every single moment.”

That quality ended up being the heart of B

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