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A WALK ON THE MOON

About The Production
In 1969, just a few miles from Woodstock, New York -- site of America's biggest ever rock ‘n' roll concert, love-fest, be-in, social revolution and hedonistic hippie celebration - an entirely different world of bungalows, bar mitzvahs and roast beef sandw

In 1969, just a few miles from Woodstock, New York -- site of America's biggest ever rock 'n' roll concert, love-fest, be-in, social revolution and hedonistic hippie celebration - an entirely different world of bungalows, bar mitzvahs and roast beef sandwiches flourished. These were the famous Catskills resorts, where Jewish families from the city vacationed as they had for decades, steeped in tradition and the rigid roles of husbands and wives, without a care for what the outside world was wearing, doing or experiencing.

But what happens when these two worlds collide? In A WALK ON THE MOON they come together in a delightfully comic and heartbreakingly real love story about a Jewish housewife who undergoes her own unexpected sexual revolution through an affair with a radically nonconformist salesman. The result is a very personal, intimate and original romantic comedy about how -- even in a time of moon walks and massive political movements -- the biggest changes often happen on the inside.

Screenwriter Pamela Gray was one of many New York children who journeyed with her family to the rarefied air of the Catskills in the late 60s, all the while aware that the world around these resorts was radically changing. Looking back at those years, she remembered how many of these often young and beautiful, and intriguingly sheltered, housewives were alone all week long while their husbands stayed behind to work in the city.

"I spent all of my summers in the Catskills and it was always just the women and the children. Later, I began to wonder what would have happened if one of them decided to have an affair," Gray admits. "It seemed like a real opportunity to explore the emotions of those times."

Thus it was that the gears of her imagination started turning and she developed the idea of a dissatisfied and repressed resort housewife, Pearl Kantrowitz, who finds herself irresistibly attracted to one of the many vendors who regularly visited the bungalow colonies. But he wasn't just any vendor, this "Blouse Man" was a sensual, adventurous, handsome free spirit who represented everything that Pearl felt she missed out on in life by becoming a wife and mother so young.

As Gray wrote, the story developed a uniquely personal tone, part cross-cultural comedy of hippies and squares, part sweeping story of triangular love, part adventure of sexual and self discovery. She brought to the characters an unusual depth and compassion, finding no single culprit for the conflicts at hand while revealing the charm and fallibility within each of them.

Gray's screenplay, which was also her film school thesis, went on to win the prestigious Samuel Goldwyn Screenwriting Award. By sheer coincidence, a year later Samuel Goldwyn's grandson, accomplished actor Tony Goldwyn, was looking for a very special screenplay in which to star. Independently, he came upon A WALK ON THE MOON and was riveted.

"It was a beautiful piece of writing filled with tremendous wit, intelligent dialogue and a truly unique voice," says Goldwyn of the script. "The story itself takes on a very classical theme, it's a familiar scenario of a woman having an affair -- but in Pamela Gray's hands it took on a freshness, an emotional daring and an authenticity about it that I just fell in love with. Pamela made you believe in each of the characters

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