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PUSHING TIN

About The Production
FOX 2000 Pictures and Regency Enterprises present a Linson Films production, A Mike Newell film, starring John Cusack (Con Air, Grosse Pointe Blank) as cocky air traffic controller Nick Falzone, and Billy Bob Thornton (Sling Blade, A Simple Plan) as his

FOX 2000 Pictures and Regency Enterprises present a Linson Films production, A Mike Newell film, starring John Cusack (Con Air, Grosse Pointe Blank) as cocky air traffic controller Nick Falzone, and Billy Bob Thornton (Sling Blade, A Simple Plan) as his stoic rival, Russell Bell, in PUSHING TIN. The irreverent look at the prevention of mid-air and mid-life collisions also stars Cate Blanchett (Elizabeth, Oscar and Lucinda) as Nick's wife Connie, and Angelina Jolie (George Wallace, Gia) as Russell's wife Mary.

The supporting cast includes Jake Weber (Meet Joe Black), Vicki Lewis (Godzilla, NewsRadio), Kurt Fuller (The Fan, Stuart Saves His Family) and Matt Ross (Face/Off).

Directed by Mike Newell (Donnie Brasco, Four Weddings and a Funeral) from a screenplay by Glen Charles & Les Charles (Cheers, Taxi), based upon the article "Something's Got To Give" by Darcy Frey. The film is produced by Art Linson (The Untouchables, Fast Times at Ridgemont High), and Alan Greenspan (Donnie Brasco) and Michael Flynn (The Crow: City of Angels, Ed Wood) serve as the film's executive producers.

Other members of the creative production team include director of photography Gale Tattersall (Virtuosity, The Commitments), Academy Award-nominated production designer Bruno Rubeo (Driving Miss Daisy), editor Jon Gregory (Donnie Brasco, Four Weddings and a Funeral) and costume designer Marie-Sylvie Deveau (Mimic). Music is by Anne Dudley (The Full Monty).

In 1996, the New York Times Sunday Magazine published an article by writer Darcy Frey entitled "Something's Got to Give." The piece chronicled the inner workings of the New York Terminal Approach Radar Control (TRACON) center, a veritable pressure cooker of the air traffic control industry, and focused on several of the men who stew in that atmosphere of stress and anxiety.

Veteran Hollywood producer Art Linson read the article and subsequently optioned the rights to the story. "I read the piece and immediately thought it would be a great premise for a movie," says Linson. "Darcy's article was funny, serious and truly original. He captured the juxtaposition of the dramatic hazards of these guys' jobs with the comic energy of their personal lives and exposed the readers to a strange new world, a world we certainly have never seen on film before."

Linson enlisted the talents of writers Glen and Les Charles, the creative forces behind the classic television series Taxi and Cheers, to pen what would become the script for PUSHING TIN.

Linson and Laura Ziskin, president of Fox 2000 Pictures, sent the script to British director Mike Newell, who had recently finished Donnie Brasco and was preparing for some much-needed rest.

"I was tired," confesses director Mike Newell, "and I was by no means sure that I wanted to go back to work. But I took a look at the script, did some work with Glen and Les and fell in love with them. They are two very inventive, receptive and bright men…wonderful writers. I so enjoyed working with them that my involvement in the project sort of rolled on from there."

Newell and the Charles brothers worked together on several drafts, creating a final script that Newell desc

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