Navigation Bar - Text Links at Bottom of Page

THE MUMMY

On Location
Principal photography for The Mummy began in Marrakech, Morocco on Monday, May 4, 1998 on the Cairo Prison set, the start of a seventeen week schedule of filming in Morocco, the United Kingdom Filming completed on Saturday, August 29, 1998

Principal photography for The Mummy began in Marrakech, Morocco on Monday, May 4, 1998 on the Cairo Prison set, the start of a seventeen week schedule of filming in Morocco, the United Kingdom Filming completed on Saturday, August 29, 1998.

Although The Mummy is very much an Egyptian story, the political climate in Egypt during the pre-production period made it impossible to set up such a major movie with all its inherent logistical problems. A decision was made to shoot the complicated location sequences in Morocco, with Marrakech providing the casbahs and bazaars of 1925 Cairo. The ruins of the lost city of Hamunaptra, the legendary City of the Dead, would be built in the Sahara desert outside the small town of Erfoud.

But what were the problems of setting up a movie the size and scale of The Mummy in Morocco? This mammoth task was the responsibility of experienced co-producer Patricia Carr who seems to have cornered the market in desert movies, having worked in the Sahara Desert on Star Wars in 1976 and Raiders of the Lost Ark in 1980; the Arizona and Yuma deserts on Return of the Jedi in 1982; and the deserts of Jordan and Spain on Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade in 1988.

"We had to do a great amount of work in a relatively small amount of time," says Carr. "But after meeting with the local city officials, we were able to get medical cover in place, as well as arrange all the catering and transportation and have everything completed in record time."

For the cast, the Moroccan locations were exotic but the conditions proved extremely difficult to shoot in, given the heat, the sandstorms and the rebellious camels.

Hannah says, "Filming in Morocco was quite an experience. The biggest challenge was maintaining the energy level right up to the start of the scene. It was really hot out there, and the snakes and scorpions and the spiders made it difficult to keep focus and your enthusiasm."

For the cast, the Moroccan locations were exotic but the conditions proved extremely difficult to shoot in, given the heat, the sandstorms and the rebellious camels.

Hannah says, "Filming in Morocco was quite an experience. The biggest challenge was maintaining the energy level right up to the start of the scene. It was really hot out there, and the snakes, scorpions and spiders made it difficult to keep your focus and maintain your enthusiasm."

Fraser adds, "The whole shoot was a bit risky, a little frightening. They had real charging horsemen coming at us with lots of blank gunfire. It was good fun though."

The actors did receive a fair amount of training to ride camels at fast speeds, and were given weapons and ammunitions training to prepare for the battle scenes.

"According to Stephen, all I had to do was turn up, shoot guns and 'look like a stud,'" says Fraser.

O'Connor adds, "The worst thing I was asked to do on this movie was to ride a camel. I was given lessons but I think I could spend an eternity learning how to do it, and still never master it. I don't think I'll ever go on a camel again."

Temperatures of 130 degrees in the early morning were commonplace during the production, but the producers knew that if they were to shoot the film anywhere in the United States it

Next Production Note Section

TOP

Home | Theaters | Video | TV

Your Comments and Suggestions are Always Welcome.
Contact CinemaReview.com

2014 8,  All Rights Reserved.

Google

Find:  HELP!

Google