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DUDLEY DO RIGHT

About The Costumes
Costumes for the film were created under the watchful eye of designer Lisa Jensen, whose main challenge in the film came from the real Royal Canadian Mounted Police and from the Disney studios, who own the rights to use the Mountie image

Costumes for the film were created under the watchful eye of designer Lisa Jensen, whose main challenge in the film came from the real Royal Canadian Mounted Police and from the Disney studios, who own the rights to use the Mountie image.

"The RCMP does not allow its uniform to be used publicly because it is impersonating an officer, unless you get special permission," explains Jensen. "Originally, the answer was no, but after establishing a relationship with the RCMP in British Columbia, where the film was shot, minimal changes had to be made, including the addition of gold tabs, a change in buttons and a change to the chevron on the collar."

In the end, Dudley's RCMP uniform was actually "built" by a person who "builds" for the RCMP.

"Brendan looks like a million bucks in that Mountie uniform," says Wilson. "Through that camera, he has almost classic movie star good looks that remind me of different periods-the '30s and '40s."

"Brendan is a wonderful actor," he continues. "He's very quiet offstage, but as soon as the camera is on there's a bang, and then he goes back to the strong silent type."

The other big challenge for Jensen was the numerous Indian costumes. She says, "We had to take these Indians that are supposed to be somewhat authentic looking doing a dance number which is somewhat campy and then going the next week and doing a dance that's Vegas campy but still has the same flavor of these odd Italian Indians that we've created."

In a $15 thousand costume complete with wig, Rocco is a strange mix of New York, Italian and native Indian with a dash of mobster. "He's Mo Green in a war bonnet," smiles Wilson. In costuming Nell, Jensen says she tossed out the floor-length prairie dress for clothes with a more elegant, grown-up '30s feel. Snidely Whiplash, who in the cartoon was the squat-bodied, skinny-legged man with the stovepipe hat, has become more Gothic in a frockcoat from the 1860's topped with a Dracula-type cape.

Although it proved challenging to costume over 40 red-coated officers mounting a charge against the wicked Whiplash in the films climactic finale, the far greater challenge was for the riders to maintain their mounts. Since so many horses were needed for the scene, many of those used had barely been ridden. With banners flying, the final edit captured a proud RCMP drill team charging in to battle to save the day.

Fraser, who had some experience in the saddle, honed his equestrian skills with daily training sessions on his horse "McFly," who stars as the infamous horse aptly named "Horse."

In summing up his wild Dudley Do-Right experience, writer/director Wilson says, "It's all pretty broad. The idea here has been that more is better. In most comedies I'd say more is not better. But here, we're pretty much eating the scenery."

"As far as the comic elements, this film definitely relies on the writing," adds Fraser, "and that's a credit to Hugh Wilson and Jay Ward. There's an apt use of props and shtick, and there's nothing like a good pratfall to spice things up! We have a strong script that takes advantage of making fun of itself, and at the same time lets people have fun watching it.

"This is a comedy with major

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