Navigation Bar - Text Links at Bottom of Page

A DOG OF FLANDERS

About The Production
In 1872, British born writer Marie-Louise de la Ramée (nom de plume Ouida, 1837-1908), who from age 29 until her death lived in her adopted country of Italy, published a book for children entitled A Dog of Flanders

In 1872, British born writer Marie-Louise de la Ramée (nom de plume Ouida, 1837-1908), who from age 29 until her death lived in her adopted country of Italy, published a book for children entitled A Dog of Flanders. While highly regarded at the time it was published, it was not until its translation into Japanese in 1908 that the tale of a young boy and his friendship with his dog gained international acclaim. Six years later, the first screen version of the tale was filmed and since then, the classic story has been told on the motion picture screen three times (in 1924-called "Boy of Flanders"-and in 1935 and 1959); there was also a German mini-series that aired in 1976 and recently, an animated version was made in Japan.

Director and screenwriter Kevin Brodie always cherished the story and decided to re-work the tale for filming in the late 90s, with Brodie himself directing the project. Production began in April 1998.

Brodie comments, "The versions of 'Flanders' came before were all good in their way. But this story covers more than the physical telling of the tale. There are spiritual and religious issues at work that weren't as fully explored as they could have been. We're living in a time when the world is ready to embrace divergent systems of beliefs-we're, all of us, looking for spiritual ideals that are universal. Love, art, redemption. And they're all there in this story written more than a century ago. That's why I wanted to make a definitive motion picture version of this story."

The film was to be shot entirely in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking region of Belgium, with various authentic Flemish historical sites and surrounding picturesque countryside serving as sets and backdrops to Brodie's retelling of Ouida's timeless story.

Veteran producer Frank Yablans was enthusiastic about his role as producer and honorary patriarch on the set. He commented, "This is, in the best and truest sense of the word, a family picture, a time-honored story that appeals to a wide range of moviegoers. I just felt that it would be a great project to produce, and it was a privilege to film in the Flanders district. This story is ingrained in the landscape, in its people and their history. There is a palpable sense of time and place here that makes 'A Dog of Flanders' distinctive, classic and timeless."

Production first set down in the ancient city of Mechelen, which is located halfway between Belgium's largest cities of Brussels and Antwerp. Interior shooting took place in the famous Rombouts Cathedral-the hallowed ground where Nello seeks to view the painting by the master Rubens and ultimately, finds redemption. The international crew led by Americans included technicians, craftsmen and artisans from such countries as Israel, the Netherlands and Belgium.

Director Brodie brought a long-standing family tradition to filming, himself being a former child star and the son of character actor Steve Brodie, who appeared in more than 200 television projects and feature films before his death at age 73.

Crucial to the story of Nello is his deeply felt respect for fellow countryman and painter Peter Paul Rubens. Rubens' masterwork, The Taking Down of Christ, hangs in the cathedral of Nello's village and becomes an elusive inspiration for the young man attempting to become a painter. In order to protect and preserve Ruben's original, the painting (wh

TOP

Home | Theaters | Video | TV

Your Comments and Suggestions are Always Welcome.
Contact CinemaReview.com

© 2014 6®,  All Rights Reserved.

Google

Find:  HELP!

Google