Navigation Bar - Text Links at Bottom of Page

IN TOO DEEP

About the Production
In Too Deep takes an authentic look at the multi-faceted, ruthless world of organized street crime-- from the perspective of the cops, the drug dealers, and all of the people that fall somewhere in the middle

In Too Deep takes an authentic look at the multi-faceted, ruthless world of organized street crime-- from the perspective of the cops, the drug dealers, and all of the people that fall somewhere in the middle. When the delineation of good and evil become obscured, Jeff Cole (Omar Epps) is faced with the toughest decision he has ever faced-- who does he choose to be?

"When Michael [Henry Brown] and I decided to tell this story, it wasn't to create just another cop movie," notes writer/producer Paul Aaron, Brown's partner at Suntaur Entertainment and co-writer of In Too Deep. "It was to show that there's a war on the streets today and pose the question: who are the real victims?"

The most important challenge for all of the film makers and actors associated with the film was to make it real-- to avoid the oversimplifications and over dramatizations that corrupt what is really at play when you go undercover-there's high risk, little protection, and you must play your part so convincingly that you can risk loosing all perspective. Aaron and Brown wanted to make sure that the screenplay captured the essence of that experience.

It was over seven years ago that Aaron and Brown first began to develop a screenplay based on the heroic and often unheralded exploits of the undercover police officers who wage war against drugs in America's inner cities. Wishing to avoid the obvious media stereotypes, Aaron and Brown undertook their own investigation and were surprised to find that, in speaking with real undercover officers, that the stories were often more shocking and harrowing than they had imagined. At the same time, the writers were impressed by the willingness of these courageous officers, who live in constant danger of having their true identity revealed, to share their experiences openly.

Fortunately for the writing pair, it was not only undercover officers who were willing to provide material which was vital to the development of their screenplay, but also those who were involved in the drug trade as well.

Once again, Aaron and Brown wanted to present a realistic depiction of drug purveyors and not simply recycle false stereotypes and cliche images. What they discovered in the course of their research was that for many who work in it, the drug trade is just another business. "It seems to them they have no option," says Aaron, "so they try to make as much money as fast as they can, building it like any other business."

To obscure the line of "good" and "bad," Aaron and Brown created Dwayne Gittens, the drug lord who assumes the outrageous nickname "God," with a complex set of values that make moral judgments about him less absolute. He's tough, he's ruthless and he's violent, but he is also a father, a friend, and a loyal protector of those who are a part of his life.

It is, in part, the moral ambiguity which surrounds Gittens, his posse and the drug trade as a whole, which leads the film's protagonist, Jeff Cole, to lose his own grip on reality and nearly undermine his mission. A fiercely ambitious and determined undercover police officer, Cole initially adopts the persona of J. Reid, a tough, fearless drug dealer from Akron, Ohio, to infiltrate Gittens' gang and bring them to justice. Soon though, he finds his fictional persona over

TOP

Home | Theaters | Video | TV

Your Comments and Suggestions are Always Welcome.
Contact CinemaReview.com

2014 5,  All Rights Reserved.

Google

Find:  HELP!

Google